Pin it! Discover the QIAGEN Pinterest boards to collect useful content and ideas

Pinterest

How many social media users are there worldwide? Best estimates are around 2.8 billion (1) – roughly 35% of all people on earth (2)! And how many full-time researchers are there? According to a UNESCO science report (3), about 8 million, a mere 0.1% of the world population! This relatively small percentage are disproportionately and increasingly using social media to share findings, communicate and collaborate. Moreover, there’s a new and rapidly growing trend in social media for researchers – to discover new scientific content. One platform – Pinterest – is paving the way with visual discovery, collection and storage.

Now you can discover new ideas for life science by following QIAGEN on Pinterest! Pinterest is a channel where researchers can save interesting content they’ve found on the web as a source for inspiration, or as reference material. The content stays linked to the original source and can be updated automatically. For example, visit the new QIAGEN “Sample to Insight” account where you’ll find our dedicated content boards. Just “pin” what you’re interested in to save items to use now, or for inspiration later.

The four QIAGEN boards feature infographics, scientific blog articles from Biomarker Insights, pathway maps and videos. You are most welcome to follow us – we’ll keep you updated with a growing amount of scientific content related to Sample to Insight solutions for PCR/qPCR, NGS and automation in life sciences. We hope you find it useful!

References:

  1. 1) https://www.statista.com/statistics/278414/number-of-worldwide-social-network-users/
    2) http://www.worldometers.info/world-population/
    3) https://en.unesco.org/node/252277
Laura Alina Mohr, M.Sc.

Laura Alina Mohr joined QIAGEN in 2015. She received her Master’s Degree in Chemical Biology at the Technical University Dortmund in Germany. During this time, she was involved in Systemic Cell Biology research at the prestigious Max Planck Institute. Before joining QIAGEN, Laura Alina worked at the Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, where she first focused on DNA damage/repair pathways and telomere biology. Later, she joined the Muscle Development, Aging and Regeneration program at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute. At QIAGEN she is interested in gene expression profiling focusing on various biological pathways, e.g. cancer research and neurodegeneration.

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