Posts Tagged: bacteria


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Meet a microbiome researcher: Q&A with marine microbiologist Dr. Andrea M. Tarnecki

As a part of our Microbiome Awards winners interview series, we spoke with Dr. Andrea M. Tarnecki, a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, Florida. Dr. Tarnecki received her Ph.D. from Auburn University, and her research interests include probiotics for use in aquaculture and deciphering beneficial host-microbe interactions. She is a recipient of… Read article →


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Power in numbers – collective antibiotic resistance

For over 70 years, antibiotics have been a critical component of the arsenal used by healthcare providers to combat bacterial infections worldwide (1). Antibiotic use has become so prevalent that over 70 billion doses were consumed globally in 2010 (1). Due to the widespread use of antibiotics, some bacteria have developed antibiotic resistance and become… Read article →


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Bacteria misbehaving in space

Tougher and more virulent? Human biology presents numerous limitations when it comes to space travel. Bacteria are more adaptable, robust and resilient, and are known to thrive in even the most extreme environments. But how do they fare in space? To date, numerous bacterial experiments have been conducted in Earth’s orbit. We know that bacteria… Read article →


Antibiotic resistance

Combating drug-resistant superbugs

Antibiotics have been used for the last 80 years to treat patients with bacterial infections. While antibiotics have greatly reduced illness and death resulting from these infections, their use has been so prevalent that microbes have adapted to them, eliminating their effectiveness. These microbes are named antibiotic-resistant superbugs. Superbugs can acquire resistance genes either by… Read article →